+ Do you see a pink flower in this image?

There´s no pink flower in this pic. The color pink does not exist within the reality of the world, so if you see pink, you have constructed the color yourself.

Without flaws, the structure of the universe would be perfect and therefore not appear to manifest something. Photo © Alexius Jorgensen.

All colours in a light beam have a complementary colour except lime green, so if you believe to see pink, which theoretically speaking should be the complementary colour of lime green, it is precisely that, namely something you believe.

To fix what seems to be a gap in the spectrum of a light beam, you run a script in the brain that automatically mixes its colours of blue and red into a pink colour each time you theoretically speaking should see this. That is why pink is said to be an extra-spectral colour in Wikipedia.

If you want more factual info about the non-existent colour pink – also called fuchsia and magenta – follow this link to its end.

According to science, it is a  perceived gap in the original structure of particles coming from the big bang, that makes it possible to think this inconsistent structure can unfold into a universe with gaps between everything. But if no gap is perceived, there is no imperfection to set off the imaginations of a world with gaps between us.

The world is designed, so it appears to be a real puzzle, where you will be rewarded if getting the pieces right. Unfortunately the puzzle is incomplete. A piece is missing and so an endless quest for something to fill the gap sets off.

In other words, perfection is the end of separation because without flaws we would not appear to be separated from each other and therefore not to exist as someone definitive.

Perfection though is not to fill the gaps with love or other childish dreams of togetherness, as doing so is based on the belief in separation – read more about that here – and therefore enhances the apparent gaps between us. Acknowledging the perception of those gaps, however, without trying to fill them with something, there is nothing to distort the perfection.

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What you think you see, is precisely that. It is an image fabricated by the brain, which has lots of scripts to automatically correct and changes the rays of light reaching the eyes into an image of the world, that looks like you expect it to be. The graphic is grabbed from the web.

Yet most fill the perceived gaps with something – often selected memories or well-established concepts – so that focus is not on the gaps but what they seem to make us see and thus on being somebody seeing it.

There is, for example, a gap in the light beams reaching our eyes when looking at something in a particular angle, that is commonly known as a blind spot. But we do not see it because the brain quickly fills the gap with something from its memory bank or the received light beams that surround the gap.

There is a story about a king who once upon a time amused himself by having people beheaded in the exact angle of his blind spot. So even without a head, they looked whole until the king moved his eyes out of the blind spot and saw a beheaded person. And so the king laughed and laughed.

Without flaws, the structure of the universe would be perfect and therefore not appear to manifest as something.

It is not only this gap or the gap of colour in the image on the top, that is a manipulation of the brain. The whole page that you think you see now on a digital media is a gap the brain has filled with something because everything digital is a meaningless combination of zeros and ones.

The same applies to the rest of the world, that you believe to see. It is as virtual as this page, and so is the brain that seems to fill it with something real – just like everything in the world seen on a computer screen is just as virtual as the app generating it.

There are probably lots of gaps in this article that the brain will fill fr you.


NOTES: This article is part of hack #4.1 Eyes cannot see.

Trackbacks

  1. […] The book ´Eye Benders: The Science of Seeing and Believing´ written by Clive Gifford explains the brain sees movements, that do not actually exist, and it also fabricate images to fill into, what it perceives as gaps in the world. You can read more about this in my article Do you see a pink flower in this pic? […]

  2. […] you collect data that seems to construct an image of a chair, that only seem to be there, because this is what you have learned to see based on those […]

  3. […] eyes do not see. They translate, and they do not translate this article, as it is written. They translate the light beams hitting your eyes from your computer or smart media according to […]

  4. […] of what seems to be a realistic world out there, even when your eyes are closed. In other words, you are deceived by the brain – but only because you want […]

  5. […] in translation If we had not learned to interpret the letters in this post as representing the english language, this post would be just as […]

  6. […] make long short: In the case of this article, you try to translate it, so it reminds you of the world in the way, you have decided it to be. You twist the translation, […]

  7. […] that could be compared to an after image of the universe. To make sense of it all you try your best to fill the gaps of the fragments with love, god or other lofty […]

  8. […] out perfect, stagnation would have been the result, but there was a few gaps in the pattern and due to this imperfection the pattern started to expand into what is called the […]

  9. […] And to believe in or argue for something to be better than something else is ridiculous, when all that can be experienced is an illusion. […]

  10. […] that could be compared to an after image of the universe. To make sense of it all you try your best to fill the gaps of the fragments with love, god or other lofty […]

  11. […] processed by the brain – also an experience like coming from the heart or living in the now. It is just a trick – and so is […]

  12. […] interpret this vision in the darkness in a much softer way. That is how we build the world. We do not see it. It is fabricated in the […]

  13. […] After the big bang particles grouped together in an almost perfect pattern. There were a few gaps though. Had it turned out to be a perfect pattern, it would have been static and not unfolded into the universe. It is gaps that keeps the universe expanding. […]

  14. […] the case of this article, you try to translate it, so it reminds you of the world in the way, you have decided it to be – most probably assuming […]

  15. […] in translation If we have not learned to interpret the letters in this article to represent the english language, they will seem just as […]

  16. […] turned perfect, stagnation would have been the result, but there were a few gaps in the pattern and due to this imperfection the pattern started to expand into what is called the […]

  17. […] *) Read more about the small daily corrections of the misleading experiences the brain is producing in the article Do you see a pink flower in this image? […]

  18. […] processed by the brain – also an experience like coming from the heart or living in the now. It is just a trick – and so is […]

  19. […] the case of this article, you try to translate it, so it reminds you of the world in the way, you have decided it to be – most probably assuming […]

  20. […] eyes do not see, they translate, and they do not translate the article, he has written. They – or rather the brain – translate the light beams hitting your eyes from […]

  21. […] The inner breath is a guide to the formlessness of that which is you As you are not conscious in a state of not-knowing it is like being blind. Not a problem though. You are used to that. In about two hours every day you are literally blind, because the brain screens out what you see, when you move your eyes, as otherwise you would get seasick. The reason we do not notice this blindness is that the brain fills the holes with visual impressions of what it predicts to happen. See also the article Do you see a pink flower in this image. […]